Schedule

2019 Schedule:

Tuesday, May 28

ICR Futurities Booth with Rulan Tangen
Location: UCR, Arts Building, outside ARTS 100
4:00 – 5:00 PM
Free and open to the public.
ICR participants are invited to think about the world we want to live in, and how ICR might contribute toward it.
ICR Workshop by Lukas Avendaño
“Instalación para Cuerpo Humano / Installation for the Human Body”

Location: UCR, Arts Building, ARTS 300
5:00 – 8:00 PM
Free and open to the public with RSVP. Please RSVP HERE.

This workshop introduces Lukas Avendaño’s theory and methodology for performing “Installations for the Human Body.” Somatic training engages the specificity of embodied and virtual memory and activates corpus-as-territory to examine the body as cultural and political construct.  Through the biological body and the performative body (bios-escénico), performance becomes an exercise in survival, rooted in sovereignty, inquiry, and ritualized aggression. Working with objects as extensions of the human body, corporeal sovereignties are activated to create the, “Installation for the Human Body.”

Wednesday, May 29

ICR Futurities Booth with Rulan Tangen
Location: UCR, Arts Building, outside ARTS 100
6:00 – 7:00 PM
Free and open to the public.
ICR participants are invited to think about the world we want to live in, and how ICR might contribute toward it.
ICR Workshop by Fabiola Torralba
“Shaking as Ceremonial Space” in relation to “N.I.M.R. (Negra India Morena Roach)” performance on May 30th

Location: UCR, Arts Building, ARTS 300
7:00 – 9:00 PM
Free and open to the public with RSVP. Please RSVP HERE.

This workshop demonstration will explore the significance of shaking isolated parts of the body and as a whole. Through review of movement vocabulary of communities across space and time we will address the implications of race, class, and gender in these forms. Moreover, we will uncover the intersections between Queer, Indigenous, Black, and Brown shaking bodies as sites of resistance and joy.

Thursday, May 30

ICR Futurities Booth with Rulan Tangen
Location: outside Culver Center of the Arts
5:00 – 6:00 PM
Free and open to the public.
ICR participants are invited to think about the world we want to live in, and how ICR might contribute toward it.
ICR Gathering 2019: Queer-y-ing Indigenous Dance
“Queer-y-ing • Queer Indigenous Dance • Y Spanish and/also, because of trans national identity focus • Ing- A gerund, a doing or making of Indigenous dance to be something it is or is not yet • A Query”
– Cuauhtémoc Peranda

Location: Culver Center of the Arts, Coil Brothers Atrium
6:00 – 9:00 PM
Free and open to the public.

William Madrigal and the Traditional Cahuilla Bird Singers, Welcome

Shash Yázhí, Opening Reflection
As a Dilbaa (Indigenous gender queer/trans) healer and guide, Shash Yázhí, holds space for the embodiment of Four Direction Fire Keepers, a traditional Indigenous Dilbaa / transmasculine community.

Javier Stell-Frésquez, “Mother the Verb”
Honoring the labor and heart of mothers of all genders, Mother the Verb wrestles with the toxicity of our relationships in this post-colonial world.

“Because our nursing infants are at the top of the food chain, they inherit a body burden of industrial contaminants from our blood by way of our milk; thus are we part of the landfill, colonized.”
– Katsi Cook, Mohawk Native American Midwife/Researcher

Fabiola Torralba, “N.I.M.R. (Negra India Morena Roach)”
N.M.I.R. explores the identity of a mixed race Afro-Indigenous descendent through social dance movement. Race, sex, gender, class, and colonialism are deconstructed from the lens of a Mexican immigrant who grew up in the U.S. amongst Cumbia, Hip Hop, and Booty dance cultures. The ritual like dance performance is a means to reflect on the representation of past-present-future migrant and diaspora bodies.

Lukas Avendaño, “Réquiem para un Alcaraván”
Réquiem para un Alcaraván is a performative dance of the man-woman.  Zapotec culture, through muxheidad, embraces homosexuality, gayness, and same-sex marriage with certain contradictions: the muxe is a man who assumes the labor roles–but also the affective, emotional, and sexual roles–culturally reserved for women. This makes muxheidad a veiled social acceptance, and at the same time, a celebration of what is considered a transgression. In Réquiem para un Alcaraván the Zapotec man-woman dances and invites the spectator to participate in “female rites of passage:” the traditional wedding; hosting and caring for images of Catholic saints; healing/praying; and mourning. The metamorphosis occurs when the soul incarnates in a local bird called the stone-curlew (berelele in Zapotec; alcaraván in Spanish); here, the male cycle closes once the alcaraván mates. In some cases, the male alcaraván is sacrificed by the female”

Dakota Camacho, “Sounding Circle: Listening and Being Heard”
With audience and Ernesto Colín, Jack Gray, Wesley Y. Leonard, Cynthia Ling Lee, Michael Madrigal, S.J Norman and Liz Przybylski as invited respondents.

Friday, May 31

ICR Workshop by Jack Gray
“Movement for Joy”

Location: Infuse Dance Studio, 3737 Main St. Ste 103A  Riverside, CA 92501
11:00 AM – 12:15 PM
Free and open to the public with RSVP.  Please RSVP HERE.

“Movement for Joy” is a 75 minute physical ‘dance’ class by Jack Gray,  formulated  as a response to the experience of contemporary stress-related symptoms arising from isolation, pressures and demands, a sedentary and computerized lifestyle and more. Gray is an internationally renowned choreographer, as well as a founding member and the current artistic director of Atamira Dance Company in Aotearoa (New Zealand), which creates and produces high quality Māori contemporary dance theatre . The class is a call and response to the personal and the collective body, with a range of moving sequences guided by Gray alongside the constant bpm of (pop) music. This practice evolved in collaboration with the visual arts, theatre and education staff and local community at Corban Estate Arts Centre in  Auckland (where Atamira Dance Company is based) after recognizing the need for people to express themselves more without an end goal. The space aspires to be all-inclusive, and supportive of a wide range of needs (all ages/all levels of movement experience/all mobilities).

EXPLODE! Queer Dance Festival with contribution from Zapotec muxe’ performance artist
Lukas Avendaño, “No Soy Persona. Soy Mariposa.”

Saturday, June 1

EXPLODE! Queer Dance Festival with contribution from Zapotec muxe’ performance artist
Lukas Avendaño, “No Soy Persona. Soy Mariposa.”

Closing to EXPLODE! Queer Dance Festival:
Two-Spirit Inverted L.S.S. with Cuauhtémoc Peranda (Mescalero Apache, Mexika-Chichimeca/Cano )
This Two-Spirit Inverted Legends, Statements & Stars/Artists/Co-Conspirators/ Witnesses is “a moment to see and  be seen.” Borrowed from the House Ballroom Scene and Two-Spirit traditions, and placed at our festivals’ conclusion (which is its inversion from its normal place of commencing), this is a time on a RUNWAY to honor those present who have helped our time together come to life.


Photo Credit: Indigenous Choreographers at Riverside 2018/Jonathan Godoy